Know Your … uhm…. STUFF! Reading Doggie Diarrhea

Continuing Education for pooper-scoopers:

Knowing when and what to tell clients about what you see adds value to your service.  Dogtime ran this article that will be very helpful in knowing what to look for in dog stool. Color, texture, and more characteristics of dog stool can carry important information about the dog’s health. Your expertise in this topic can make you much more than “just a poop scooper.”

Diarrhea In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, And Treatments
“Diarrhea in dogs is the passing of loose or liquid stool more frequently than usual. Treatment for diarrhea can be simple or more complicated depending on the underlying cause. Diarrhea symptoms could be related to problems with your dog’s small intestine, large intestine, or other organs. To help your veterinarian determine the cause, be prepared to answer questions about your dog’s diet, habits, and environment, as well as specific details about the diarrhea. Once your veterinarian has narrowed the list of possible culprits, they can plan for specific tests to determine the exact cause and treatment. Here is what you should know about the symptoms, causes, and treatments for diarrhea in dogs.”
Read more at http://dogtime.com/dog-health/1878-dog-diarrhea-wsu#jJMulzvbm27FZb7X.99

 

Feel the Love!

Your neighbors will love you for having your yard cleaned regularly.

Your dog isn’t the only one who will LOVE having the yard cleaned regularly!  You will love being able to devote your precious little free time to the things you really want to do, and you will love not having do deal with the worst part about having a dog.

Your family will love the domestic tranquility of not having to fight over who has to shovel the dog poop.

Your clients will love that you can focus more on your professional projects.

And your neighbors will love that your yard isn’t attracting pests and stinkin’ up the neighborhood!

(And, if you have a neighbor who has a yard that needs to be cleaned, turn them on to pooper-scooper.com as a public service.)

 

Promote Domestic Bliss. Hire a Scooper.

“Research has shown couples with dogs enjoy greater well-being than those without canine companions…”

Professional scoopers often hear from clients about how great it is that having a dog waste cleanup service has eliminated the arguments about who has to scoop the poop.

Another good way to promote domestic bliss is to train your dog. Read more at DogTime.com:

How Dog Training Can Help Your Marriage

Pooper-Scoopers Help Control Rats

 Ald. Matt O'Shea (19th) blamed backyards filled with dog poop for recent sightings of rats in Mount Greenwood. Much of the conversation at a town hall meeting Wednesday night focused on the rodent problem.

Ald. Matt O’Shea (19th) blamed backyards filled with dog poop for recent sightings of rats in Mount Greenwood. Much of the conversation at a town hall meeting Wednesday night focused on the rodent problem.View Full Caption

DNAinfo/Howard A. Ludwig

MOUNT GREENWOOD — An emerging rat problem in the neighborhood can be attributed to one thing, the 19th Ward alderman said: dog poop.

“You know why rats come into certain areas? Dog feces.” Ald. Matt O’Shea

Read the full story here:

Dog Poop Blamed For Rat Infestation

Is it Crazy to Hire a Pooper-Scooper? It’s Crazy NOT to Get That Mess Cleaned Up.

 

“The major concern with animal waste is that it is nasty stuff in it that can either make you sick or make the environment sick. Animal waste, like human waste, contains bacteria and viruses that if it gets into water bodies that people use can give them all kinds of nasty things, the most common of which is stomach flu.” — Jon Devine, a senior attorney at the National Resources Defense Council

Read more in this article at LifeHacker.com:

How to Keep Your Dog from Destroying the Environment

Dogtime Article: Tapeworms in Dogs

Tapeworms In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatments

Mike Clark writes about a subject of great importance for all pooper-scoopers in the article at Dogtime.com

“If you see the signs of tapeworm infestation in your dog, [LET THE CLIENT KNOW SO THEY CAN] get to the veterinarian immediately so they can prescribe treatment. Here is what you should know about the symptoms, causes, and treatments for tapeworm in dogs.”

Read more at http://dogtime.com/dog-health/55775-tapeworms-dogs-symptoms-causes-treatments#lDdSXeSWPIpVkHZ6.99

 

8 Essential Tips from PetMD

8 Essential Tips for Picking Up Dog Poop

“No one likes scooping pet waste. It’s messy and smelly, but cleaning up is a very necessary part of being a responsible pet parent.”

Read more about Effective Ways to Scoop the Poop, By Victoria Schade, at

http://www.petmd.com/dog/slideshows/8-essential-tips-picking-dog-poop

Celebrate Service Dogs

Many professional scooping services are proud to offer generous discounts to clients with service dogs!

September is National Service Dog Month, a time designated to raising awareness and showing appreciation for the extraordinary work service animals do every day for the people in their care. National Service Dog Month honors these working dogs for making millions of lives better and safer.”

Learn more about guide dogs and other service dogs, and some organizations that help, in thisarticle Vicki Clinebell wrote this article for DogTime

Celebrate National Service Dog Month September 2017

 

It’s Important for the Environment

“Dog waste contains extremely high levels of phosphorus and nitrogen, and when added to the water, encourages rampant algae growth. This growth depletes oxygen levels in water, making it difficult for other aquatic organisms to survive.

“As dog waste decomposes, components can seep into the groundwater or run off into surface waters during rain events or snowmelt. The rivers and streams of the Wood River basin are fed almost entirely by rain and snow runoff, making our water systems particularly vulnerable. Therefore, every time dog waste is left on the trail, it adds to the pollution of our local waterways—the waterways that we depend on for drinking, irrigation and recreation.”

Hadley DeBree and Alisa McGowan, Environmental Resource Center, Ketchum

Read the full article at http://www.mtexpress.com/opinion/letters_to_editor/picking-up-dog-waste-is-important-for-valley-environment/article_5d4a42d4-8780-11e7-aefb-0b8ac5d9df65.html :

Picking up dog waste is important for valley environment